Latest Orders
Out of stock!
Enter your email to be informed when this product arrives:


Send Close
Out of stock!
Enter your email to be informed when this product arrives:
Send Close

Lost Planet 2 CD Key

No Downloader
Region Free
Various Language
Units Sold: 26
Reward Points: 200
Availability: In Stock
$21.99 $14.99

Price in reward points: 10000


0 reviews

 What will you get:

 You will get Lost Planet 2 CD Key (scan of the cd key from original DVD box).  You can activate the game in Windows Live. This game can not be activated on Steam platform. 

 About The Game:

  Feature-for-feature, Lost Planet 2 should be an improvement over the original. It sports four-player online co-op, a robust multiplayer mode complete with unlockable goodies, and impressive visual design with lots of variety and artistic flair. Yet amazingly, this third-person sci-fi shooter represents a major step backward for one important reason: It isn't much fun. Not only did developer Capcom not address the problems of the original, but it exacerbated them. Fundamental design flaws inhabit almost every gameplay mechanism. Awful mission design leaves you wondering how to proceed; abysmal AI makes playing on your own an exercise in masochism; and an overreliance on knockback attacks and other bizarre design choices are sure to inspire worldwide epidemics of controller-throwing rage. Not even replacing your three useless AI companions with real-life buddies alleviates all of the pain because the frustrations are woven into the very fabric of the experience. Entertaining multiplayer modes and some enjoyable, larger-than-life battles against looming insectoids lift Lost Planet 2 out of the abyss, though even those aspects aren't without their problems. This is a beautiful game you desperately want to like, yet it goes out of its way to punish you for it.

At least the sequel offers up a lot more variety than its predecessor. You'll sprint through a number of diverse locations, and fantastic visuals really bring the planet of E.D.N. III to life. Some frigid areas hark back to the original, including the prologue, which features great Lost Planet standbys: giant mechs known as vital suits (or VSs), enormous aliens called akrid with glowing orange spots (hint: shoot them!), and snow flying everywhere. In other levels, red light bathes industrial corridors, lightning flashes brightly above a turbulent sea, and cyclones sweep across the desert plains. There is a ton of eye candy to take in, and plenty of attempts to vary the pace. Over the course of the game, you will rush through the desert on a roaring speeder; defy gravity in the blackness of space; and bring down a giant akrid from the inside. Jungle shootouts, battles on conveyor belts, and a boss fight in a sandy ghost town--conceptually, the game's got all the elements of a full-featured, varied, and beautiful shooter. Unfortunately, Lost Planet 2's scattershot mission design squanders the goodwill the early hours generate. Early levels take just a few minutes to complete, too often coming to an end just as things appear to be picking up. Later levels are brought down by abysmal signposting and other botched basics. One late-game chapter takes place within a towering tube in which you activate data posts located at various levels. But unlike in most games, Lost Planet 2's minimap doesn't indicate whether an objective is above or below you. (This is but one of the game's countless "Game Design 101" failures.) You might wander aimlessly, searching for those posts or the terminal you must reach to end the mission, simply due to the game's communication failures. A late boss fight is just an endlessly boring march through one linear corridor after another, composed mainly of firing at pulsing orange pustules, rather than the larger-than-life encounter you'd hope for at such a climactic moment. But if there's one mission destined to be remembered as one of the worst shooter levels of all time, it's certainly one involving two speeding trains. The first two-thirds are mind-numbingly frustrating, particularly if you tackle the campaign on your own. A couple of enormous rocket turrets pummel you, easily knocking you off the train and wasting precious respawns, all while your AI companions run in place, stuck against doors that don't open. Many of Lost Planet 2's levels are designed to kill you should you get knocked out of them, which is a bizarre design choice considering the frequency with which you get knocked back, and the force with which it happens. But what makes this level worth special mention is its staggeringly awful final third. A giant worm akrid attacks the speeding locomotive, a diagram of the train you've never seen before appears on the screen, and you're told--absolutely nothing.

 


Norton Safe Web website security
All product names, brands, images, logos and trademarks belong to their respective owners. All rights reserved. CDKeysHere © 2014.